Woman Power Wednesday: Vickey Curtis
For this week's Woman Power Wednesday we're chatting to the amazing Vickey Curtis. Vickey is a spoken word artist who made headlines last year when she spoke out about her experience in a misogynistic and homophobic attack. We spoke to Vickey about the connection between misogyny and homophobia, spoken word and inspiring women. 



Photo from instagram.com/raginspice

-Do you think speaking out about the incident where you were attacked on a night out after challenging a man on his misogynistic and homophobic comments reminded people that often misogyny and homophobia are intertwined?

Yeah, I think it reminded people that hate is definitely layered and that an attack such as mine isn’t only rooted in one sort of hate, but many. I'm sure that it got people thinking about it too. People who’d never thought about it before, people who are in a privileged position where their identity is never questioned, it hopefully made them question that or shed some light on it and made them look at their own privilege and how they question those attacks.



Photo from instagram.com/raginspice 

-The post you made about the attack received a lot of attention, both negative and positive. Did you expect that post to get the attention it did and how did you deal with the different reactions? 

Janey Mack the response was way beyond what I thought it would get. It took me back to be honest. I'm glad it got the attention it did, I'm glad that I've a big mouth and am brave enough to speak up and out about the shit that happens. The support I got from other victims and allies was great. My words helped other victims have bravery in telling their stories too or so they told me. I didn't bother with any negative comments, I was too focused on healing from the actual attack to notice the keyboard crazies. I'd only take negative comments seriously if they were said to my face and to be honest, if people had said something to my face I'd have had a thing or two to tell them, but those kind of folk aren't actually brave enough to have courage in their convictions and say those comments to someones face.



Photo from rte.ie

-The Marriage Equality Referendum was obviously an amazing achievement for the LGBTQ community in Ireland, but do you think it has made people feel as if the community now faces no problems?

Yeah I think that people from both within the community and outside the community think that everything is ok now that we marriage equality. Well, it's not. We still have bullying in schools, we have transphobia and issues for the trans community to fight. Our gay spaces are dying and that for me is a major issue. HIV infections are on the increase. These are all issues that the community faces and if people think that marriage equality made everything ok, it didn't.



Photo from instagram.com/raginspice 

-What is it about spoken word that attracted you to it as an art form?

I like its immediacy. It's a great medium for being able to react to something quickly. My work is rooted in social issues mainly, so when something crazy is happening in the world I am quick to pick up my pen and perform. Spoken word is a great medium to give voice to issues. I think for an audience member it's really accessible as well. That's the real joy of it, that there are rarely airs and graces to it, it's raw, it's in your face. It speaks to many people at one time. As a spoken word performer, there is a real kick in performing to many different people and they all understand where your piece is coming from and can relate to it. I guess thats what drew me to it, the relatability and ease in which you can communicate with it.



Photo from flickr.com 

-What women inspire you? 

Women with courage, who speak up, who take a stand. Women like Catherine Corless who don't give up and keep fighting. 



Check out Vickey's website here
Follow Vickey on Instagram here 


Ciara x 

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